If you have to borrow money to enter a university straight away, don’t. Go to a community college. Pick rigorous courses that you know will transfer (talk to the institution you want to transfer to), and get them at an 80% discount off the cost of state university prices. Don’t borrow a dime. If you need a boost to finish after demonstrating ability at a community college, borrow sparingly in the last two years, but never in the first two. Never.

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

College President’s Open Letter to High School Class of 2019

By Walter Wendler This has been published a number of times at spring break over the past decade. It is updated here and refreshed in its importance for the honesty and transparency required to make a good university great for a region. The third Maxim of WT 125: From the Panhandle to the World, “Build Undergraduate […]

Texas Flagship Universities Fly the Flag for Freedom of Speech on Campus Campuses

(From Forbes.com) By Tom Lindsay In January, Texas A&M University became the Lone Star State’s sole university to receive the highest possible rating for its protection of the First Amendment on campus. At the same time, it appears that the University of Texas System is considering taking its own principled stand for freedom through adopting the University of […]

Coordination of Higher Education in Texas

By Walter Wendler Raymund Parades, the Commissioner of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), recently announced his resignation, effective August 31, 2019. This announcement caused me to reflect on the complexity of the enterprise and the importance of the coordination among the many members if higher education is to effectively serve the aspirations of […]

Can the Traditional College Model Survive?

By Walter Wendler As we begin 2019, anyone involved in higher education, student or family member, spouse or friend, high school principal or daycare worker, instructor or president, knows things are changing at universities. Whether a public or private, for-profit or not-for-profit, online or on-campus, universities are in flux. And this broth of changing forces […]

Students tell their stories in new free speech booklet

Protecting free speech on campus will be on the docket again in many states as lawmakers begin their sessions in the coming weeks. Texas will be one, if TPPF’s Policy Orientation is any indication (Stanley Kurtz, who co-authored the Goldwater Institute’s 2017 report along with me and Jim Manley of the Pacific Legal Foundation, was […]

Regional Universities and Economic Development

By Walter Wendler All universities have economic impact on the regions and communities in which they are located. Changing views of higher education have affected the role of the university as an economic development engine. A university education is a combined public and private good, benefiting everyone in the public square while simultaneously directly benefitting […]

After Public Backlash, Texas Education Will Continue to Remember The Alamo

(From forbes.com): By Tom Lindsay When I moved from Illinois to Texas, years ago, my children were still at the K-12 level. Helping my seventh-grader with her homework, I was struck by my new state’s commitment to teaching the history of Texas. Earlier this month, that commitment appeared to be wavering. But today, thanks to a […]

Reflections of a Retiring College Trustee

By Ronald Trowbridge (pictured) My swan song as a trustee at Lone Star College I will very soon serve my final day as a trustee at Lone Star College, and I want to leave my final thoughts. Having been a teaching adjunct at the college for six years and a trustee for six, I know […]

This Texas Law Hinders Free Speech

We trustees, though, had been warned that when even at a social function we should not discuss college business ever. That restriction — censorship — is utter nonsense. It says, “Remain ignorant.”