See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Admission Against Interest: Professor Says We Already Have Enough College Students

In a recent column in The Journal Record, an Oklahoma City business newspaper, Oklahoma City University law professor Andrew Spiropoulos challenges the conventional wisdom on the need for more college graduates. “Gov. Mary Fallin and politicians-turned-higher-education-bureaucrats like Chancellor of the State System of Higher Education Glen Johnson and University of Oklahoma President David Boren agree […]

The Lack of Civility in Today’s Academic Discourse

Over the past year and a half I have published some 30 op-eds constructively critical of the status quo of higher education.  Surprisingly, I have received few rebuttals, primarily because all of my pieces have been data-filled.  I let the data do the talking. Still, there are some who just cannot stand any criticism of […]

The Academic Double Standard on Bush and Obama

In the current issue of the Claremont Review of Books John Yoo recounts the “embarrassingly biased statements [about George W. Bush] from some of the leading lights” of the history profession as he reviews Stephen F. Knott’s Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics.  Eric Foner, Joseph Ellis, Douglas […]

Professor X

Let me be unmistakably clear:  most college professors are conscientious, hard-working professionals.  But many are not.  I base this on extrapolation from a half dozen indolent professors I encountered in getting my Ph. D. at the University of Michigan.  Frankly, I really didn’t know how they could in good conscience take their paychecks. I illustrate […]

Educating the Educators—About How to Read

Recently, Binks-Cantrell, Washburn, Joshi, and Hougen (2012) expanded the study of teacher knowledge of basic language constructs to a new population of teachers – university instructors.  Their hypothesis was that one of the reasons many of our pre-service and in-service teachers lack the knowledge of reading constructs is because they are not receiving adequate preparation […]

American Higher Education: Is It in Crisis?

Is American higher education in crisis?  If you mean “is higher education in an unsustainable and precarious position, which will force major changes in a fairly short time period?” I suspect the answer is yes. If, however, you mean “is higher education in imminent danger of collapse or immediate radical change,” the answer is “no.” […]

Harvard Refocuses the MBA

Last year, the Harvard Business School announced that it is making major changes to its curriculum and that these changes, according to its marketing release, are aimed to “create leaders of competence and character, rather than just connections and credentials”.  Evidently there is a certain concern and maybe a little guilt that 58% of its […]

Training vs. Education

In 1644 John Milton sketched the curriculum of an academy for students aged twelve to twenty-one. “This place should be both school and university.” His target was educational reformer John Amos Comenius, who advocated (in modern terms) a child-centered education that aimed at preparing students for a profession. Milton’s proposal was for (again in modern […]

Prescient Lawmaker Challenges Higher Ed Groupthink

It’s been said that higher-education administrators treat regents like mushrooms: “Keep them in the dark and feed them manure.” Regrettably, some haughty administrators—in my home state of Oklahoma, higher education is known as the fourth branch of government—often treat state lawmakers the same way. Fortunately, not all lawmakers are content to stay in the dark. […]