See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Remarkably Low Literacy Among New York’s Prospective Teachers

As long as public school officials are required to hire only prospective teachers who have gone through the education school mill, we – that is, the hapless children who desperately need academically-minded teachers — will continue to suffer from classroom mediocrities.

Whither remedial classes?

Some lawmakers are relying on high school diplomas as the main indicator of student readiness for college and whether or not a student needs remedial work. Unfortunately, the spotty and often poor quality of education that students receive in K-12 schools is what causes students to need remediation.

Biased APUSH: Your Child’s Final Exposure to U.S. History?

In Texas, major universities Rice, SMU, TCU, and smaller Abilene Christian do not require a U. S. history course.
In California, none of the four largest schools require the course: Stanford, California-Berkeley, UCLA, and University of Southern California.

Thinking Too Highly of Higher Ed

Now education has taken the place of housing. If a college degree always means higher wages, then everyone should get a college degree: That’s the conventional wisdom encapsulated by Obama.

2014 Election: The rest of the results

Illinoisans voted in favor of a 3 percent tax increase for millionaires in order to collect more money for schools, although this referendum was not attached to a binding proposal to raise taxes. Before residents get too excited about sticking it to the rich, they should talk to Maryland residents. In 2009, the Wall Street Journal reported that one year after passing a millionaire tax, “one-third of millionaires … disappeared from Maryland tax rolls.” In fact, tax revenue collected from state millionaires actually declined after the tax was passed.

Kudos to Department of Ed for Recent Innovations

This accountability enhancement is long overdue and, of course, has already received criticism from some of the usual suspects among teacher organizations, one of which characterized the linking of federal grants with program evaluations as “troubling.” But linking performance to accreditation and funding is the only way to get their attention, and Duncan is to be applauded for leading in this direction.