“The greatest risk you face is an institutionalized system, with each college or university grasping for its own ends without regard to the needs of the people of the whole state, and perhaps without being aware of those needs.” He suggested to these tenderfoot higher education leaders, “You should leave politics to the politicians and administration to the administrators.”

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Coordination of Higher Education in Texas

By Walter Wendler Raymund Parades, the Commissioner of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), recently announced his resignation, effective August 31, 2019. This announcement caused me to reflect on the complexity of the enterprise and the importance of the coordination among the many members if higher education is to effectively serve the aspirations of […]

Creating a non-PC University

By William Murchison Well, now, if  you want to reform  higher education — bring it into line with historic standards and expectations– you can, of course, set up the National Committee to Buy Harvard for, well, just how many billions?  More than Jeff Bezos keeps in his home safe. Or you can listen attentively to […]

The Foreign Language Slide

By Mark Bauerlein The Modern Language Association just reported an astonishing statistic. From 2013 to 2016, colleges and universities in the United States shut down fully 651 programs or offerings in foreign language fields. Students just aren’t enrolling in language classes (the major in all foreign languages combined is down more than 20 percent since […]

The (Academic) Empire Strikes Back Against Whistle-blowing Professor

By George Leef One of the biggest stories of 2018 in the academic world was the success that three academics had in getting supposedly reputable journals to publish articles they had concocted from nothing – pure hoaxes. The hoax papers made a strong case that the publication standards in the fields covered (such as gender […]

The Grievance Hoax and Peer Review

By Mark Bauerlein It was quite an embarrassment.  A team of, well, we’ll call them watchdogs, sent bogus research papers to social science journals for publication and received several acceptances.  (The authors detail their project here. One of the papers, “The Conceptual Penis as a Social Construct,” was taken by the journal Cogent Social Sciences.  […]

Human Potential

By Walter Wendler Without trappings, the ultimate purpose of a university education is to enhance human potential. While wrapping up a high school visit in Amarillo, Texas, I asked the audience of students and parents if anyone had any questions. A young man sitting towards the back of the room with our head football coach […]

The Real Gender Trouble

By Mark Bauerlein If you consulted only the press, you would think that gender and women’s studies programs were potent forces on college campuses today.  At insidehighered.com recently, for instance, we read of a “Global Attack on Gender Studies,” as if conservative powers were mobilizing against an established and prominent part of higher education. Added […]

Teaching Must Come First

  By Walter Wendler (Originally published on November 30, 2015.  As we begin this season of reflection, “Teaching First” is worthy of another look as we focus on the first purpose of the university and the importance of staying true to our roots.) Forward focus is essential. Over the past four decades, many faculty and university […]

College Readiness

By Walter Wendler When colleges are confronted regarding low six-year graduation rates (52% in Texas) and low persistence rates—the rate at which freshman continue into the second year of college (about 73% nationally), the immediate response of too many in leadership positions is to blame high schools for low college readiness marks. College readiness is […]

The “Test-Optional” Trend – Good or Bad?

By George Leef It used to be the case that every American high school student who had any thoughts about college took either the SAT or ACT. Both are standardized tests meant to assess how “college ready” a student is. Those who scored very well knew they would be accepted and probably do well at […]