See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

The “State Disinvestment” Myth?

While the percentage of funding coming from state and local sources has fluctuated over the decades, it has stayed in roughly one steady, relatively narrow band, and we remain in that band today.

Remarkably Low Literacy Among New York’s Prospective Teachers

As long as public school officials are required to hire only prospective teachers who have gone through the education school mill, we – that is, the hapless children who desperately need academically-minded teachers — will continue to suffer from classroom mediocrities.

Forgive Us Our (Student Loan) Debts?

One of the programs designed to implement Obama’s vision for student loan forgiveness “privileges” (to use a term that’s all the rage these days) those who go on to work for the government or non-profit organizations.

Policymakers should boost WGU’s high-quality, low-cost education

We learned this month that WGU is producing the largest number of science and math teachers in the United States. And as Vance Fried, a research fellow at the Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs, has pointed out, “while WGU’s educational quality is high, its tuition is low.”

Whither remedial classes?

Some lawmakers are relying on high school diplomas as the main indicator of student readiness for college and whether or not a student needs remedial work. Unfortunately, the spotty and often poor quality of education that students receive in K-12 schools is what causes students to need remediation.

How to Deal with Student Debt?

It never occurs to Ross or people like him that the problem of students who have amassed too much debt is entirely the result of government meddling.

2014 Election: The rest of the results

Illinoisans voted in favor of a 3 percent tax increase for millionaires in order to collect more money for schools, although this referendum was not attached to a binding proposal to raise taxes. Before residents get too excited about sticking it to the rich, they should talk to Maryland residents. In 2009, the Wall Street Journal reported that one year after passing a millionaire tax, “one-third of millionaires … disappeared from Maryland tax rolls.” In fact, tax revenue collected from state millionaires actually declined after the tax was passed.

How The ‘College-For-Everybody’ Agenda Harms Both Students And The Economy

In higher education, the vision “that everyone should go to college”—like all well-intentioned projects suffering only tenuous connections to reality—asks “too much from those at the bottom, . . . the wrong things from those in the middle, . . . and too little from those at the top.”

Are Colleges Using Their Space Wisely?

Through incentivizing universities both to maximize their use of existing space and to offer additional courses online, the Texas legislature would go no small way toward ensuring a more affordable college education for Texas students and therewith smaller student-debt loads.