Absent compassion, our intelligence is ultimately of little value; or as C.S. Lewis is claimed to have suggested, “Education without character may make a man a more clever devil.”

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Human Potential

By Walter Wendler Without trappings, the ultimate purpose of a university education is to enhance human potential. While wrapping up a high school visit in Amarillo, Texas, I asked the audience of students and parents if anyone had any questions. A young man sitting towards the back of the room with our head football coach […]

Are College “Diversity Statements” Beneficial?

By George Leef In just 40 years, we have gone from a using “diversity” as merely a “plus factor” that colleges and universities could consider in choosing which students to admit (that was the impact of the Bakke case in 1978, a tenuous legal thread that only Justice Powell in his pivotal opinion suggested) to […]

The Real Gender Trouble

By Mark Bauerlein If you consulted only the press, you would think that gender and women’s studies programs were potent forces on college campuses today.  At insidehighered.com recently, for instance, we read of a “Global Attack on Gender Studies,” as if conservative powers were mobilizing against an established and prominent part of higher education. Added […]

How Colleges Can Better Serve Their Students

By Vic Brown During the time I spent teaching at a liberal arts college, the school president liked to say that every decision the college made had to be one that would support student achievement. It was a noble sentiment, but perhaps college administrators and trustees need to now ask themselves a very different question: […]

The Top Ten Strengths of American Higher Education

By Walter Wendler This reflection was originally published on April 10, 2016. I believe it is worth a second look, and it appears here with only a few modest updates.  WVW American universities are the best in the world. This is widely recognized by experts in higher education from every nation. Fifteen of the world’s top 20 universities […]

Clicks or Bricks

By Walter Wendler With the growing pervasiveness of online and distance education opportunities (Clicks), future students will have transcripts peppered with courses from different modes of instructional delivery at different institutions. At West Texas A&M University, rarely will a student’s academic record come completely from courses taken on campus (Bricks). This “academic diversity” will become […]

Teaching Must Come First

  By Walter Wendler (Originally published on November 30, 2015.  As we begin this season of reflection, “Teaching First” is worthy of another look as we focus on the first purpose of the university and the importance of staying true to our roots.) Forward focus is essential. Over the past four decades, many faculty and university […]

The Integration of Military Service and College Study

By Walter Wendler In 1783, New York Governor George Clinton, proposed that in every state at least one public college should train people for entry into military service. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Morrill Act that said in part …the maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall […]

Generation Z Goes to College

A new report from the Chronicle of Higher Education explores the next generation of college students: Generation Z. Also called iGen or post-millennials, the new generation has different needs and interests than the Millennials that came before. “The New Generation of Students: How Colleges Can Recruit, Teach, and Serve Gen Z” is written by Jeff […]

Diversity Engineering

By Mark Bauerlein The diversiphiles are desperate.  Nearly 50 years of affirmative action of various kinds still haven’t produced a sufficient critical mass of under-represented groups in the sciences.  It isn’t enough that attitudes have changed.  Whatever forms of sexist or racist biases afflicted the science faculty in 1970, they’re gone now—or so far underground […]