See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Part 1 of “Forgive Us Our Debts? – Not a Chance”

Editor’s Note:  Beginning today, we are reprinting a 15-part series on college-student-loan debt.  (Thank you to onlinecolleges.net for putting this together.)   15 Sad but True Facts about Student Loan Debt Collection by Staff Writers October 4, 2012 By now, most people have heard about the staggering amount of debt that the average college grad […]

SHOCKER: STUDY SHOWS UNIVERSITY FACULTY BECOMING LESS DIVERSE

In “Moving Further to the Left,” Scott Jaschik of Inside Higher Ed reports the following: “Academics, on average, lean to the left. A survey being released today suggests that they are moving even more in that direction. “Among full-time faculty members at four-year colleges and universities, the percentage identifying as “far left” or liberal has […]

A MODEST PROPOSAL TO CUT UNIVERSITY COSTS BY 10 PERCENT–FIRE THE DEANS!

In the last forty years, there has been a revolution in management theory, largely driven by insights of W. E. Deming and the Quality Circles model, first implemented successfully in Japan and largely responsible for the revival of Ford in the U.S.  This new model flattens the hierarchical structure of management, eliminating layers of middle-level […]

YET ONE MORE EXAMPLE OF HOW PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES WASTE TAXPAYERS’ DOLLARS

  In present economic times when the continuation of jobs and positions in higher education is uncertain, some university departments have found novel ways to ensure they will be “needed”.  A prime example is the Institutional Review Board (IRB). The IRB was originally established to ensure that research is performed ethically and to protect the […]

WHAT ABOUT THE SUPPLY SIDE?

In my last two blog posts, I have argued that college affordability is largely in the hands of higher education consumers. Only when students and families begin to change their behavior on the margin will we begin to see higher education expenditures reigned in. A recent report from educational lender Sallie Mae suggests that this […]

THE FOLLY OF USING CURRENT SPEECHES TO TEACH ENGLISH

            Fortunately, I no longer teach in a place where I am forced to use a preselected textbook.  When I did for many years as I taught freshman composition and literature survey courses in various units of the Georgia State University System, I found myself searching for a diminishing list of classic texts.  At one […]

Beyond the Diversity Charade: Who Needs Selective Admissions?

As I explained in my last column, the Supreme Court has held that state universities can set aside both the ban on racial discrimination in the 14th amendment and a colorblind interpretation of the Civil Rights Act on the grounds that “diversity” in college enrollment is a “compelling state interest”, comparable to victory in World […]

UT’s Diversity Charade, part 1

There may be, at least in theory, exceptional cases in which it is reasonable and just for a government to treat its citizens differently on the basis of their race. However, America decided, both in 1868 and again in 1964 and 1972, to ban all such racial discrimination by government and government-aided schools. In the […]

A $10K Degree in the Liberal Arts

In this year’s State of the State address, Governor Perry called for the state’s public universities to begin offering a BA with a total cost (including tuition, fees and textbooks) of $10,000, in contrast to the current rates of between $26,800 and $45,300. If we include the cost to taxpayers, the total bill at UT-Austin […]

They Came, They Saw, They Flunked

The College Board has released the SAT scores for the class of 2012. In a world of rapid change, it is reassuring to know that some things remain the same. The percentage of test takers who achieved the SAT College and Career Readiness Benchmark was 43%, the same as last year. In American education any […]