See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Sorry, But ‘College Is Too Expensive’ Is Not A ‘Myth’

Increasing federal student aid was found only to incentivize schools to hike tuitions further. . . . Specifically, the study finds that every dollar of additional Pell Grants or subsidized student loans results in tuitions being raised between 55 cents and 65 cents.

No End In Sight For Higher-Education Malinvestment

“More college graduates are working in second jobs that don’t require college degrees,” writes Hannah Seligson in the New York Times, “part of a phenomenon called ‘mal-employment.’ In short, many baby-sitters, sales clerks, telemarketers and bartenders are overqualified for their jobs.”

College Completion: Just Add Structure

Nearly half of all students who undertake postsecondary programs in the U.S. do not achieve the desired credential. So our high rate of matriculation (approximately 70%) is undermined by our low level of completion (54%).

Coming Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges?

What is happening at Sweetbriar is beginning to happen at a lot of places. The pool of 18-to-22 year olds is stagnant at the moment. College costs have risen relative to the perceived benefits. Overinvestment in higher education has lowered the rate of return and increased the risks.

Uncle Sam, Student Loans, and The Sopranos

The federal government operates what looks like a predatory loan program for families. . . . Politico’s Michael Grunwald says the PLUS loans have “much higher interest rates and fees, and far fewer opportunities for loan forgiveness or reductions.”

How to Counter the Tax-Hikers in the Higher Ed Debate

The Obama administration’s loan forgiveness policy does very little good for students who get their AA or BA degrees at typical colleges, but it does tremendous good for those who get advanced degrees at pricey universities and then go into “public service” work.

Whatever you need to know in the future, you don’t know it now

What if you could save tax-free for education no matter your child’s age, without limits on how much you could save, or what educational expenses are allowable? What kinds of opportunities would open up for students of all ages with that kind of flexibility? You could use the funds to prepare for college or for job training later in life.