See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

We Have Oversold Law School – Now What?

Just because existing lawyers average $113,000, that tells us nothing about the prospects for new lawyers entering at the margin. Lots of recent law school graduates have found out that the good results on average for those who earned their JDs in the past are completely meaningless for them.

Glittery Debt Perspective

I’m sorry, but having debt in exchange for an education that is supposed to enable one to earn a great deal more over a lifetime, without an obligation to furnish years of unpaid service to the lender, is not indentured servitude.

Purdue preparing novel way to fund college

Call it what you will, but Purdue University is rethinking financial aid after the nation’s class of 2015 was named the most indebted in United States history.

The Federal Government as a Predatory Lender

The evidence is pretty clear that our government meets all the qualifications as a predatory lender. This is just one more episode of a system of perverse market incentives instituted by government that will not end well.

Sorry, But ‘College Is Too Expensive’ Is Not A ‘Myth’

Increasing federal student aid was found only to incentivize schools to hike tuitions further. . . . Specifically, the study finds that every dollar of additional Pell Grants or subsidized student loans results in tuitions being raised between 55 cents and 65 cents.

No End In Sight For Higher-Education Malinvestment

“More college graduates are working in second jobs that don’t require college degrees,” writes Hannah Seligson in the New York Times, “part of a phenomenon called ‘mal-employment.’ In short, many baby-sitters, sales clerks, telemarketers and bartenders are overqualified for their jobs.”

College Completion: Just Add Structure

Nearly half of all students who undertake postsecondary programs in the U.S. do not achieve the desired credential. So our high rate of matriculation (approximately 70%) is undermined by our low level of completion (54%).