See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

The “Crisis” That Isn’t: Student Debt

A crisis is one of the best opportunities because worried people are apt to fall for weak arguments and let the politicians have their way. Now, to work this way, the crisis doesn’t even have to be real. Here’s an example: the supposed student loan crisis.

Chasing College Loan Debt

Federal lawmakers should use these guidelines to solve the higher ed loan crisis. New borrowing methods, more reasons to bail out borrowers, and new websites don’t count as answers.

A Million-Dollar Idea for the #MillionStudentMarch

Interestingly enough, 5% of each of the salaries of the top 200 earners at Texas State, or the top 6% of employees, amounts to $1,430,083, more than enough to ensure that all campus workers can earn a living wage. Call me what you may, but the solution seems simple.

The College Financial Counselor in Your Pocket

More and more students are becoming aware of scholarship opportunities and loan options, but they need help on the whole road to graduation. If the first step is helping students realize they can afford college, the second—and equally important—is building their knowledge of how to make it through.

No-Fault Debt

This kind of idiocy and manipulation is inevitable when dreams go uncurbed by reality. It will happen when we give people easy escapes from responsibility. And it will only aggravate the sour morale of people who didn’t make such mistakes when they see the fruits of bad behavior shuffled onto their shoulders.

The Newly Updated Help-That-Hurts List

For several years I have maintained an informal list of studies finding that funds from government student aid programs are in one way or another “captured” by colleges, universities, or someone other than the students whom the money is supposed to help.

Amid Campus Protests, Universities Worry About . . . Fundraising

Growing numbers of Americans now deem college costs to have exceeded the value of a bachelor’s degree. If campus unrest spreads, and administrators show themselves to be unable or unwilling to restore a rigorous learning environment on campus, how long will already-skeptical supporters continue to donate?