See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Debt Forgiveness and Liquidation

The messy dismantling of Corinthian Colleges is moving through a federal bankruptcy court, as a judge mulls whether to halt loan repayments for up to 350,000 former students and the defunct for-profit chain seeks the court’s approval for the fire sale of its remaining assets.

A Wharton Professor Asks, Will College Pay Off?

Even though a certain drug will be beneficial to a majority of patients, we know that it can be very detrimental to others. If you wouldn’t take a drug just because it helps most people, neither should you go to college because it helps most people.

Coming Demise of Small Liberal Arts Colleges?

What is happening at Sweetbriar is beginning to happen at a lot of places. The pool of 18-to-22 year olds is stagnant at the moment. College costs have risen relative to the perceived benefits. Overinvestment in higher education has lowered the rate of return and increased the risks.

Uncle Sam, Student Loans, and The Sopranos

The federal government operates what looks like a predatory loan program for families. . . . Politico’s Michael Grunwald says the PLUS loans have “much higher interest rates and fees, and far fewer opportunities for loan forgiveness or reductions.”

The Fall of Big State U

In the heyday of the flagship universities in the 1950s and 1960s, state governments spent the bulk of their funds on just a few functions—primarily transportation, public safety and corrections, and higher education. That is no longer the case.

How to Counter the Tax-Hikers in the Higher Ed Debate

The Obama administration’s loan forgiveness policy does very little good for students who get their AA or BA degrees at typical colleges, but it does tremendous good for those who get advanced degrees at pricey universities and then go into “public service” work.

Whatever you need to know in the future, you don’t know it now

What if you could save tax-free for education no matter your child’s age, without limits on how much you could save, or what educational expenses are allowable? What kinds of opportunities would open up for students of all ages with that kind of flexibility? You could use the funds to prepare for college or for job training later in life.