See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

A College Without Classes

Forget credit hours—in a quest to cut costs, universities are simply asking students to prove their mastery of a subject.

For-profits Have the Toughest Challenge

Next time you hear how awful for-profit are, keep in mind how their student bodies stack up against the non-profit sectors: they are much more challenging to work with, consisting to far greater degrees of the marginalized people federal policy is supposed to be helping.

We Have Too Many Colleges, So Cut Federal Funding

As we’ve poured more and more government money into college “access,” schools have pocketed much of the money and gone on a spending spree – and then increased their tuition and fees, leading politicians to cry that they must increase student aid more to keep higher education “affordable.”

How Many Colleges and Universities Do We Really Need?

American higher education remains the envy of the world. But that respect really only extends to a few hundred universities at the most. At too many colleges attended by the vast majority of American students, costs are spiraling out of control and quality is declining.

Sorry, But ‘College Is Too Expensive’ Is Not A ‘Myth’

Increasing federal student aid was found only to incentivize schools to hike tuitions further. . . . Specifically, the study finds that every dollar of additional Pell Grants or subsidized student loans results in tuitions being raised between 55 cents and 65 cents.

No End In Sight For Higher-Education Malinvestment

“More college graduates are working in second jobs that don’t require college degrees,” writes Hannah Seligson in the New York Times, “part of a phenomenon called ‘mal-employment.’ In short, many baby-sitters, sales clerks, telemarketers and bartenders are overqualified for their jobs.”