See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

How Am I Supposed to Learn Anything Without a Lazy River and Wet Wall?

It’s easy to blame sheer greed for colleges raising their prices at breakneck speeds . . . but it would be wrong to conclude they’re doing it only because they’re hopelessly money-grubbing. No . . . colleges often have to furnish expensive amenities, dorms, etc., to compete for students.

The Real Cost Of College

When considering government support for American higher education as a whole, subsidies for colleges and universities are—even on a per-student basis and despite the enrollment explosion—greater than ever before.

Corinthian Should Just Be a Sideshow

The overall problems in higher ed dwarf proprietary schools, and no amount of anti-profit zealotry will change that. So let’s stop obsessing over what should be sideshows.

Should Universities Own Patents?

Traditional universities want to have it both ways: they want the tax subsidies and exemptions associated with their non-profit status, but they also want to claim they own private intellectual property and make millions from that as well.

New Arizona State-edX MOOC: Another Blow To Traditional College

ASU-edX courses and low-cost microdegrees are a pincer movement against the traditional four-year degree. The combination of a for-credit transferable MOOC freshman year and the core classes offered by partnerships like Google and Coursera strike at the heart of the traditional university business model.

University Online-Compliance Officer: “I Wish My Job Didn’t Exist”

A few states have taken a reasonable approach to regulating online education. An example is Wyoming. Wyoming requires two things before we can offer our programs to its residents: we must be regionally accredited and pay a $100 fee. . . . Most states, however, take a different approach.

Higher education and private sector investment

Income share agreements would take the burden of college tuition repayment off of taxpayers and ask employers to invest more in the human capital they hope to find in the job market. That is certainly an improvement over Washington’s method of asking taxpayers for more money.