No one is required to use their 529 account for K-12 expenses. Likewise, state lawmakers should not limit a student’s options. It is impossible for observers or policymakers to identify the specific students for whom the option is a good fit. This is all the more reason for states to make sure this new opportunity is available to everyone.

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Can Families in Your State Take Full Benefit of 529 Savings Plans?

In September, we wrote here that some state lawmakers had work to do in order for families to make the most of their personal savings for their child’s education. This week, a new Heritage Foundation report provides an updated state-by-state analysis of what’s happening with federal law, state laws, and families’ attempts to save for private K-12 […]

The Integration of Military Service and College Study

By Walter Wendler In 1783, New York Governor George Clinton, proposed that in every state at least one public college should train people for entry into military service. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the Morrill Act that said in part …the maintenance of at least one college where the leading object shall […]

Generation Z Goes to College

A new report from the Chronicle of Higher Education explores the next generation of college students: Generation Z. Also called iGen or post-millennials, the new generation has different needs and interests than the Millennials that came before. “The New Generation of Students: How Colleges Can Recruit, Teach, and Serve Gen Z” is written by Jeff […]

Scholarships and Student Support

As the cost of college attendance continues to escalate, private support through both need- and merit-based scholarships is more important than ever. The sources for private giving available to students continue to multiply. Last year, in federal grant money alone, $2.9 billion was left on the table. With growing concerns regarding college costs, this is […]

College Readiness

By Walter Wendler When colleges are confronted regarding low six-year graduation rates (52% in Texas) and low persistence rates—the rate at which freshman continue into the second year of college (about 73% nationally), the immediate response of too many in leadership positions is to blame high schools for low college readiness marks. College readiness is […]

Textbook-Free, Not Free Textbooks

By Walter V. Wendler Last week, Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget Mick Mulvaney reported that student debt now exceeds $1.53 trillion—a burden that millennials carry. There are no silver bullets. Hope for many lies in loan forgiveness. In all likelihood, it will not happen. For me, it is a moral issue:  People […]

Why The Declining Public Confidence in Higher Education?

By Walter Wendler There is a shifting public perception regarding the value of universities both to society in general as a public good, and to individuals as a private good, according to a recent Gallup study. It is sad for me. I have been involved in university work of sundry kinds since 1975. Republicans, Democrats […]

Regional Universities and Economic Development

By Walter Wendler All universities have economic impact on the regions and communities in which they are located. Changing views of higher education have affected the role of the university as an economic development engine. A university education is a combined public and private good, benefiting everyone in the public square while simultaneously directly benefitting […]

Queen Latifah Never Finished College—So What?

According to a new commercial for Strayer University, one of Queen Latifah’s “biggest regrets” is that she never finished college. It was always one of her parents’ dreams that she would go. (You can view the commercial here.) But did Queen Latifah make the wrong decision by dropping out? Evidence points to “no.” Queen Latifah […]

Good Question – Why Is College So Expensive?

By George Leef The cost of going to college keeps rising at a pace well above general inflation. Americans have been seeking explanations for that fact for years, and a recent article in The Atlantic tries to provide one. Amanda Ripley’s “Why Is College in America So Expensive?” gets some things right, but misses the […]