See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

A Huge Challenge and Dilemma for Higher Ed in Texas

Based on research conducted by the Coordinating Board and Houston Endowment on the fall 2000 cohort of Texas eighth graders, only 19% of them earned any sort of postsecondary credential within six years of expected high school graduation, and for the economically disadvantaged segment of this cohort the result was 9%.

The “State Disinvestment” Myth?

While the percentage of funding coming from state and local sources has fluctuated over the decades, it has stayed in roughly one steady, relatively narrow band, and we remain in that band today.

Remarkably Low Literacy Among New York’s Prospective Teachers

As long as public school officials are required to hire only prospective teachers who have gone through the education school mill, we – that is, the hapless children who desperately need academically-minded teachers — will continue to suffer from classroom mediocrities.

Whither remedial classes?

Some lawmakers are relying on high school diplomas as the main indicator of student readiness for college and whether or not a student needs remedial work. Unfortunately, the spotty and often poor quality of education that students receive in K-12 schools is what causes students to need remediation.

Biased APUSH: Your Child’s Final Exposure to U.S. History?

In Texas, major universities Rice, SMU, TCU, and smaller Abilene Christian do not require a U. S. history course.
In California, none of the four largest schools require the course: Stanford, California-Berkeley, UCLA, and University of Southern California.

Thinking Too Highly of Higher Ed

Now education has taken the place of housing. If a college degree always means higher wages, then everyone should get a college degree: That’s the conventional wisdom encapsulated by Obama.