See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

How to Counter the Tax-Hikers in the Higher Ed Debate

The Obama administration’s loan forgiveness policy does very little good for students who get their AA or BA degrees at typical colleges, but it does tremendous good for those who get advanced degrees at pricey universities and then go into “public service” work.

Campus Cannibals?: A Student’s Take on Political Correctness

No one, whatever his/her identity, has a monopoly on truth. This idea is central to the Enlightenment and to American democracy, and it is profoundly threatened by a leftist ideology that elevates identity over ideas. The end of free speech on campus may just be the beginning.

War on Academic Achievement?: The Plight of Asian-Americans

Asian-Americans have the lowest acceptance rate for each SAT test score bracket, having to score 140 points higher than a white student, 270 points higher than a Hispanic student, and 450 points higher than a black student to be on equal footing with these ethnic groups. If this isn’t a flagrant double standard, how would we define one?

Trigger warnings, colleges, and the ‘Swaddled Generation’

Praising Chicago’s example, Purdue President Mitch Daniels laid out the stakes in a telephone interview: “If universities want to embarrass themselves with their behavior, allowing people to be shouted down or disinvited, that’s their problem.

How Am I Supposed to Learn Anything Without a Lazy River and Wet Wall?

It’s easy to blame sheer greed for colleges raising their prices at breakneck speeds . . . but it would be wrong to conclude they’re doing it only because they’re hopelessly money-grubbing. No . . . colleges often have to furnish expensive amenities, dorms, etc., to compete for students.

The Real Cost Of College

When considering government support for American higher education as a whole, subsidies for colleges and universities are—even on a per-student basis and despite the enrollment explosion—greater than ever before.

Is a “bias incident reporting” system any better than a speech code?

Colorado’s Bias Incident Reporting system will become a wet blanket thrown over free speech on campus. Eventually, it will probably be challenged on First Amendment grounds, but even if it falls, look for the people on campus who really believe that speech should be controlled rather than free to come up with something else.