See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

The Campus Assault on ‘Privilege’

If we’re concerned about how to raise ourselves up, the first step is to stop complaining about the privileges others have provided for their children. Instead . . . teach the next generation to take those advantages and do even better.

Bridging STEM and the Liberal Arts

Scores from the National Assessment of Educational Progress show that only 18% of the students are proficient in history, and less than a quarter are proficient in civics, and they remind us that “citizenship is a skill that must be taught over time with the same devotion we give to reading, math and the pursuit of scientific knowledge.”

Trigger warnings, colleges, and the ‘Swaddled Generation’

Praising Chicago’s example, Purdue President Mitch Daniels laid out the stakes in a telephone interview: “If universities want to embarrass themselves with their behavior, allowing people to be shouted down or disinvited, that’s their problem.

A liberal calls out intolerant leftists who smother free speech on campus

From their silent role models on the faculty and in university leadership, students learn that silencing works. The mob learns that colleges like Brandeis, which disinvited women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali from campus due to intolerant complaints about her activism, will succumb to criticism rather than defend freedom.

Is a “bias incident reporting” system any better than a speech code?

Colorado’s Bias Incident Reporting system will become a wet blanket thrown over free speech on campus. Eventually, it will probably be challenged on First Amendment grounds, but even if it falls, look for the people on campus who really believe that speech should be controlled rather than free to come up with something else.

Are Students Customers?

Everything we know about where the higher education mission is headed today tells me that the notion of the student as a customer is becoming dominant in this trade-off and a big part of me is pained by the fact that, for example, the humanities and liberal arts are the losers, and with them, the pursuit of learning for its sake.

Reforms aimed at fighting grade inflation are falling short

The pressures to grade inflate are many: to attract students and boost enrollment; to appease graduating students seeking employment; and the desire on the part of universities to be “feeder schools” for graduate programs.