See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Answering union critics on education savings accounts

With an [education savings] account, the state deposits a child’s funds from the state education formula into a private bank account that Melanie and Wade can use to buy educational products and services for their children. Texas lawmakers are considering making these accounts available to state families.

The Movement for “Free” College Seems Doomed, If Not Already Dead

Dead, dead, dead seems the idea of federal subsidized tuition: which frees colleges and universities – and the states that operate them – to devise remedies of their own, away from the helpful stare of the federal education establishment. Things might have turned out worse.

Oh Look, a Chicken!

“Those who choose this course will be invited (I smell bacon, what time is it? I’m hungry) to examine ways of knowing (little ants, carrying a morsel of food across the table) through embracing what it means to be a distracted learner.”

Hey, Kids – How About Taking Hip Hop Studies?

The professor maintains that “Hip hop is universal – it brings together a lot of diverse people from around the world.” But that could be said about a great many things that shouldn’t be topics of college study, such as soccer or beer or pets.

Good Advice from Secretary Duncan

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan laid out his concerns with teacher training across the nation, a problem which, because of the critical importance of effective classroom teaching to student achievement, is one of the final frontiers in public education reform.

Thomas Sowell Indicts Our Higher Ed System

If college education leads graduates to support bad public policy, does the resulting harm to our country outweigh the good? That is just how the great economist Thomas Sowell sees it.

Protest Politics, Chaos Culture

To fully understand the current theater as it has arisen on campus, we must realize that the riotousness of students runs a lot deeper than election-year politics. The marches and mayhem are, in fact, a reflection of the larger cultural and social lives that undergraduates lead.