See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Education and Democracy

NOTE: Today is Constitution Day, which celebrates the signing of the Constitution by the Convention in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787.   In 2004, Congress passed a law requiring all government-funded educational institutions to provide instructional programs on the history of the American Constitution every September 17th.  We at SeeThruEdu.com commend Congress for its recognition that […]

Rights, Duties, and the Vocation of Professor

Even when faculty accept the distinction between training for a profession and education for citizenship, conflicts arise between their role as teachers and their rights as citizens. Some teachers use class time to advocate partisan political positions. I disapprove, but understand they believe the right to free speech guaranteed under the US Constitution‘s First Amendment […]

The Lack of Civility in Today’s Academic Discourse

Over the past year and a half I have published some 30 op-eds constructively critical of the status quo of higher education.  Surprisingly, I have received few rebuttals, primarily because all of my pieces have been data-filled.  I let the data do the talking. Still, there are some who just cannot stand any criticism of […]

The Academic Double Standard on Bush and Obama

In the current issue of the Claremont Review of Books John Yoo recounts the “embarrassingly biased statements [about George W. Bush] from some of the leading lights” of the history profession as he reviews Stephen F. Knott’s Rush to Judgment: George W. Bush, the War on Terror, and His Critics.  Eric Foner, Joseph Ellis, Douglas […]

Professor X

Let me be unmistakably clear:  most college professors are conscientious, hard-working professionals.  But many are not.  I base this on extrapolation from a half dozen indolent professors I encountered in getting my Ph. D. at the University of Michigan.  Frankly, I really didn’t know how they could in good conscience take their paychecks. I illustrate […]

Educating the Educators—About How to Read

Recently, Binks-Cantrell, Washburn, Joshi, and Hougen (2012) expanded the study of teacher knowledge of basic language constructs to a new population of teachers – university instructors.  Their hypothesis was that one of the reasons many of our pre-service and in-service teachers lack the knowledge of reading constructs is because they are not receiving adequate preparation […]

Lowering College Costs on the Margin

In an earlier blog post, I argued that the fundamental solution to the college cost problem is in the hands of students and families. They are the ones who keep saying yes to ever higher tuition and fees. They are the ones who eschew modest accommodations in favor of schools with ostentatious dormitories. They are […]

Illiteracy and Teacher Preparation

Research tells us that about 40% of children will struggle with learning how to read and continue to struggle with reading throughout their lives if they never receive direct, explicit, and systematic instruction in the foundational basic language constructs of reading – including phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension (National Reading Panel, 2000), as […]

Sociology and Insight into the Liberal Mind

It’s rare to find a conservative sociologist (odds are about one in thirty), but it’s even rarer to have one addressing a group like the Madison Forum in Georgia, a group named after the father of the Constitution.  As I argue in the Fall issue of Academic Questions, conservative professors need to leave their ivory […]