See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

2014 Election: The rest of the results

Illinoisans voted in favor of a 3 percent tax increase for millionaires in order to collect more money for schools, although this referendum was not attached to a binding proposal to raise taxes. Before residents get too excited about sticking it to the rich, they should talk to Maryland residents. In 2009, the Wall Street Journal reported that one year after passing a millionaire tax, “one-third of millionaires … disappeared from Maryland tax rolls.” In fact, tax revenue collected from state millionaires actually declined after the tax was passed.

How The ‘College-For-Everybody’ Agenda Harms Both Students And The Economy

In higher education, the vision “that everyone should go to college”—like all well-intentioned projects suffering only tenuous connections to reality—asks “too much from those at the bottom, . . . the wrong things from those in the middle, . . . and too little from those at the top.”

Are Colleges Using Their Space Wisely?

Through incentivizing universities both to maximize their use of existing space and to offer additional courses online, the Texas legislature would go no small way toward ensuring a more affordable college education for Texas students and therewith smaller student-debt loads.

Kudos to Department of Ed for Recent Innovations

This accountability enhancement is long overdue and, of course, has already received criticism from some of the usual suspects among teacher organizations, one of which characterized the linking of federal grants with program evaluations as “troubling.” But linking performance to accreditation and funding is the only way to get their attention, and Duncan is to be applauded for leading in this direction.

Aid to College Students: Where to Draw the Line on ‘Coerced Charity’?

“Among not-for-profit institutions, the amount of taxpayer subsidies hovers between $1,000 and $2,000 per student per year until we turn to the most selective institutions. . . . Among these already well-endowed institutions, the taxpayer subsidy jumps substantially to more than $13,000 per student per year.”

School choice and helping students find a home

Lawmakers should give homeless students access to flexible educational options and private school scholarships so that children in these families can have the same quality options as children from middle class and wealthier families. These choices will help break the cycle of poverty and give at-risk children hope for the future.