Last week, insidehighered.com published an opinion entitled “How to dismantle the workings of whiteness and redistribute power in academe.”

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Diversity Fails, Whiteness Carries On

I hope it is clear to readers that Vidal-Ortiz is entirely correct in his assessment of what diversity ends up doing to the non-white teachers and scholars it professes to support. It makes them carry their identity with them all the time.

The Hole at the Center of Multiculturalism

From the very beginning when multiculturalism displaced Western civilization as the steering wheel of the humanities curriculum, you could tell that they didn’t mean it.

“Aggressive Sensitivity” in the Classroom

But things had changed, irremediably so in his opinion. He quit the class. It was cancelled. No more of this, he said, in spite of appeals made by the administration to him to stick it out. It didn’t matter that his superiors backed the professor.

Bruce Cole: Scholar, Leader, Warrior

Bruce Cole died on January 8. He was 79 years old. People know of Bruce because he led the National Endowment for the Humanities during the George W. Bush administration, the longest tenure of any chairman of that agency. How he got there is a study in why he is worth remembering.

The Columnist on College

At this point, it is impossible to speak honestly about higher education and politics without acknowledging widespread anti-conservative bile. Identity politics are too strong and severe and, most important of all, broadly publicized to be denied. So, liberal commentators such as Rampell just ignore them.

The Habit of Trying

Researchers studied how students in the United States and in China would respond to a cash performance incentive. That the paid American students tried harder is an unsurprising conclusion. But here’s the disheartening part: The bribe made no difference to the Chinese students. They tried their best with or without money.

The Manufacturing of Controversy

If we really want to stop bias and high-handedness in higher education, we need to make less of the occasional outrages and focus more on the ordinary outlooks and activities of entire academic areas where tendentiousness and partisanship have become standard operating procedure.

A Waning of Indignation?

We still have illiberal episodes taking place, such as the protest at William & Mary against an ALCU official. But I suspect that student outrage and anguish and accusation are already on the wane. Protest is wearing itself out.

The Left in the Universities

There is a book coming out that everyone interested in campus politics should read. It is a refresher course in the recent past, years 1998-2010, well before the current protests and disinvitations and riots broke out, though it foreshadows everything that has happened since.

The End of Diversity

Silence followed for another day or two until a note of an altogether different tenor arrived. I’d been disinvited. The note began, “I have been advised that we must focus more on a gender balance for the panel and that I should be adding another female speaker. So at this time I am sorry to say I have to withdrawal my invitation.”