See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

The Stony Brook Problem

No administrator is going to close programs to which undergraduates flock every semester. Popularity counts in the competitive market of departments.

You Just Can’t Understand

Those of us who entered the humanities as graduate students in the 1980s and strove to climb the institutional ladder in the 1990s know of a particular ritual that became a common feature of academic debate in those years. You might call it the “You-don’t-know-what-it’s-like” moment.

The Middlebury Gatekeepers

For leftist professors to invoke legitimacy against Charles Murray–and to do so without any hint that legitimization is a highly political, problematical practice–runs against the critical theory that the left has been espousing ever since the Seventies.

The Wrong Solution to Student Learning

Millennials consider themselves a special cohort–they have all the right opinions about justice and humanity–but when it comes down to the basics of math and verbal skills, they fall well short of their own appraisal.

Millennial Civics

Our schools seem to have failed to teach youths the first fact of democratic politics: You’re gonna lose sometimes. And that’s not an injustice. It’s the price of freedom.

Protest Politics, Chaos Culture

To fully understand the current theater as it has arisen on campus, we must realize that the riotousness of students runs a lot deeper than election-year politics. The marches and mayhem are, in fact, a reflection of the larger cultural and social lives that undergraduates lead.

The Gender Non-Gap

The Old Boy Network ended long ago, at least in the areas of literature and language. Nobody wants to say so, and I haven’t heard a young person in my profession remark upon the current equality in any way for 20 years. But the numbers are clear. These pledges of encouragement to women in job ads are obsolete.

Competition, Results, and Personal Safety

Everybody wants to be safe. Nobody likes nonstop insecurity. But selective schools, always in search of excellence, can’t remain selective and excellent without competition. The meritocracy must continue—and so will anxiety.