The only way to end administrative bloat, then, is to cut off its sources of funding. Students, parents, states, and the federal government must reward efficiency and real academic activity on campus, not ever-growing administrative activity.

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

An Army of Low-Level Administrators

In 2010, Jay P. Greene released an eye-opening report, “Administrative Bloat at American Universities: The Real Reason for High Costs in Higher Education.” He wrote: “Between 1993 and 2007, the number of full-time administrators per 100 students at America’s leading universities grew by 39 percent, while the number of employees engaged in teaching, research or […]

Yes, STEM majors earn more

We all know the conventional wisdom: STEM majors earn more than humanities and liberal arts majors. Year after year, parents and pundits exhort students to choose practical majors so they can get good jobs, pay off their student loans, and prosper in a modern economy. But how much truth is there in the conventional wisdom? […]

Reform Group Proposes Big Changes to College Athletics

College sports are ripe for reform. If adopted, the Drake Group’s proposals will go a long way to combat the increased commercialization of college athletics and put the “student” back in student-athlete.

Adult Students Are the New Normal

America’s image of college students as 18-year-olds ambling through leafy quads or attending weekend football games is woefully out of date.

An Alternative Pathway to Employment

Many students who would be otherwise disinterested in higher education force themselves to attempt college with the hope that it will help them get a foot in the door to a good job. Now, a new company, Strive Talent, is offering some of those reluctant students an alternative path to employment.

A Crisis of Confidence? Or something more fundamental?

Only a third of students believe they will graduate with the skills and knowledge to be successful in the job market (34 percent) and in the workplace (36 percent). Just half (53 percent) believe their major will lead to a good job.