Both books make the case that we should be concerned about the modern appetite for excitement, novelty, and entertainment. They come at the expense of memory, reasoning, and deep understanding. Reading—deeply, regularly, and widely—is good for our brains and good for society.

See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

Books are still best

On campus, in the media, and in academic literature, there has been a growing concern about the shrinking attention spans of modern Americans. The evidence is everywhere. Facebook ads fly by at record rates. Students ignore their professors’ lectures so they can check their text messages. And the length of news articles has dwindled so […]

Yes, There Is A Reproducibility Crisis In The Social Sciences

Since the Enlightenment, advances in science have improved the world in innumerable ways: from Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine to Norman Borlaug’s Green Revolution. Dedicated researchers and technicians have worked tirelessly and sometimes slowly, applying the scientific method to address society’s most pressing problems. Such advances require careful attention to detail and application of the scientific […]

Can Genetics Research Improve Education?

The journal Nature Genetics published a study on July 23 that has sent the education observers into an uproar. The study was a collaboration by dozens of researchers using genetic data from more than 1 million people.  The researchers identified more than 1,000 data variants that are correlated with educational attainment. But is this a […]

Textbook Prices are off the charts. Are Open Educational Resources the Answer?

A 2013 study by the Government Accountability Office revealed that the price of college textbooks rose 82 percent between 2002 and 2013, more than three times the rate of inflation. Data from the College Board put those figures into perspective: the average college student spends about $1,200 per year on books and supplies. This is […]

It’s No Wonder Students Can’t Pay Their Debts–Colleges Blur Loan Requirements

A new report by New America and uAspire concludes that financial aid award letters are often too confusing to be useful to prospective students. The report, entitled “Decoding the Cost of College: The Case for Transparent Financial Aid Award Letters” lambasted award letters for obfuscating useful information about loans. It concluded, “award letters lack consistency […]

An Army of Low-Level Administrators

In 2010, Jay P. Greene released an eye-opening report, “Administrative Bloat at American Universities: The Real Reason for High Costs in Higher Education.” He wrote: “Between 1993 and 2007, the number of full-time administrators per 100 students at America’s leading universities grew by 39 percent, while the number of employees engaged in teaching, research or […]

Yes, STEM majors earn more

We all know the conventional wisdom: STEM majors earn more than humanities and liberal arts majors. Year after year, parents and pundits exhort students to choose practical majors so they can get good jobs, pay off their student loans, and prosper in a modern economy. But how much truth is there in the conventional wisdom? […]

Reform Group Proposes Big Changes to College Athletics

College sports are ripe for reform. If adopted, the Drake Group’s proposals will go a long way to combat the increased commercialization of college athletics and put the “student” back in student-athlete.

Adult Students Are the New Normal

America’s image of college students as 18-year-olds ambling through leafy quads or attending weekend football games is woefully out of date.