See Thru Edu is a project of the Texas Public Policy Foundation

Thomas K. Lindsay, Ph.D., Editor in Chief and Director, Center for Higher Education, Texas Public Policy Foundation

We Have Oversold Law School – Now What?

Just because existing lawyers average $113,000, that tells us nothing about the prospects for new lawyers entering at the margin. Lots of recent law school graduates have found out that the good results on average for those who earned their JDs in the past are completely meaningless for them.

Federal Rules Run Afoul of First Amendment

I’m going to focus on the last consequence—the way federal intervention in higher education has empowered bureaucrats to whittle away at free speech on (and even off) campus.

Analyst: “The Same, Tired Arguments on the Fisher Case”

I would like to see Professor Mitchell, or anyone else, try to show how “fairness” is advanced by an admission system that is stacked against the children of Asian families, some of whom had ancestors who also suffered from discriminatory American laws and policies.

Will Americans Be Better Off If They Use “Bias-Free Language”?

The people who spent their time coming up with the Guide did nothing to help educate any student. If anything, their infatuation with revising English so that everyone feels included and is never assailed by linguistic microaggressions gets in the way of clear writing and thinking.

An Upcoming Supreme Court Case Has Education Unions Worried

Onerous opt-out procedures are intended, as one union spokesperson actually admitted, to take advantage of people’s inertia. What would happen if unions had to obtain money the way all other private organizations do – by asking for it?

How to Counter the Tax-Hikers in the Higher Ed Debate

The Obama administration’s loan forgiveness policy does very little good for students who get their AA or BA degrees at typical colleges, but it does tremendous good for those who get advanced degrees at pricey universities and then go into “public service” work.

Is a “bias incident reporting” system any better than a speech code?

Colorado’s Bias Incident Reporting system will become a wet blanket thrown over free speech on campus. Eventually, it will probably be challenged on First Amendment grounds, but even if it falls, look for the people on campus who really believe that speech should be controlled rather than free to come up with something else.